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Raikkonen fastest, Hamilton crashes on day 1 of Jerez test

Kimi Raikkonen set the pace for Ferrari on day 1 in Jerez (Image: Ferrari)

Kimi Raikkonen set the pace for Ferrari on day 1 in Jerez (Image: Ferrari)

The first day of pre-season testing for 2014 Formula One cars has come and gone. It included a few red flags, a crash (for Lewis Hamilton) and a some modest mileage for a few of the teams.

What day 1 of testing in Jerez did not include was a Marussia F1 car. The following statement appeared on the team’s Facebook page early in the day, explaining the delay:

“After encountering a small but frustrating technical glitch with the MR03 during its sign-off, we are very pleased to inform you that the car is now well on its way from our Technical Centre in Banbury, bound for Jerez. The garage here is ready and waiting and we look forward to seeing the car arrive tomorrow. Thanks for all your support!”

Also absent from the test was the Lotus E22. Lotus decided some time ago to skip the first test, which means that the first running of their new car will take place in Bahrain on 19 February.

It was expected that the first day of testing would be relatively quiet. With all-new power units in the cars, the complexity involved in this year’s testing is significantly greater than was the case last year. And teething problems are inevitable. There were plenty of those.

McLaren did not run their new car, the MP4-29, at all, after electrical problems hampered their efforts throughout the day. Caterham managed only one lap with their new driver, Marcus Ericsson. Sebastian Vettel covered just three laps in the Red Bull RB10 and did not set a lap time.

It was only a matter of time before someone crashed in testing, and the first man to damage his car on track was Lewis Hamilton in the Mercedes W05. To be fair to Hamilton, it really was not his fault at all. The front wing of his Mercedes failed at high speed on the main straight, which effectively prevented him from slowing down enough to take the first corner. Hamilton went off into the tyre barrier at the end of the straight in an accident very similar to that of Fernando Alonso in Malaysia last year.

Fortunately, Hamilton was unhurt and the damage to the car did not appear to be too extensive. Mercedes nonetheless decided not to run again for the rest of the day in order to investigate the cause of the front wing failure.

Until his accident, Hamilton was comfortably the quickest driver of the day and looked set to cover more mileage than anyone else. As it turned out, Kimi Raikkonen went on to set the standard for the day in both respects. He covered 31 laps in the Ferrari F14 T and set the fastest time of the day, seven tenths of a second quicker than Hamilton’s best effort.

Lap times in testing seldom mean much, as it’s difficult to know exactly what the teams are testing at any given point. With brand new cars that are as different to their predecessors as this year’s F1 cars, lap times on day 1 of testing mean nothing at all, so there is very little point in analysing them.

What is perhaps telling at this point is the amount of mileage the teams were able to cover. Ferrari did more than twice as many laps as any other team aside from Mercedes. That is the result of a measure of reliability, which will please the team greatly. It remains to be seen whether or not the F14 T will continue to run without problems in testing. The car did stop on track on its very first installation lap in the morning, but Ferrari reported that the stoppage was “precautionary.”

Here are the lap times and lap count for each team from day 1 in Jerez:

1. Kimi Raikkonen, Ferrari, 1m 27.104s, 31 laps
2. Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes , 1m 27.820s, 18 laps
3. Valtteri Bottas, Williams, 1m 30.082s, 7 laps
4. Sergio Perez, Force India, 1m 33.161s, 11 laps
5. Jean-Eric Vergne, Toro Rosso, 1m 36.530s, 15 laps
6. Esteban Gutierrez, Sauber, 1m 42.257s, 7 laps
7. Sebastian Vettel , Red Bull, No time, 3 laps
8. Marcus Ericsson, Caterham, No time, 1 lap

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Ferrari unveils 2014 F1 car

Ferrari F14 T (Image: Ferrari)

Ferrari F14 T (Image: Ferrari)

The latest Formula One car to be unveiled in the 2014 pre-season is the Ferrari F14 T, the car that will be driven by Fernando Alonso and Kimi Raikkonen in this year’s World Championship.

As with all of the cars revealed thus far, the most striking feature of the F14 T is the nose, although Ferrari have gone with a different solution to that seen on the Williams, McLaren and Lotus cars. Whereas its rivals have generally gone with very thin ends to the nose, Ferrari have gone for a wider, flatter nose, which makes the car the most attractive (the word is used cautiously) to be unveiled yet.

Ferrari F14 T (Image: Ferrari)

Ferrari F14 T (Image: Ferrari)

Ferrari are the first team to show images of the rear-end of their 2014 car. However, it appears that they have fitted a dummy diffuser for the photographs. As the diffuser produces a significant amount of downforce, it is not unusual for the teams to keep their diffusers under wraps as far as possible before the season starts.

The rear-end image shows the rear-exiting exhaust well. The lower beam wing seen on F1 cars from previous years is conspicuous by its absence, as it has been outlawed by the regulations for this season.

In terms of other noticeable changes on the car, the sidepods are larger than on last year’s car, as required by the regulations, and the front wing is narrower.

The F14 T will make its testing debut in Jerez, Spain on Tuesday 28 January.

Click here for the full image gallery of the F14 T.

 

Ferrari F14 T Image Gallery

2014 Ferrari F1 car to be called F14 T

Ferrari F14-T

F14 T is the name chosen by the fans for the 2014 F1 Ferrari (Image: Ferrari)

The fans have voted! Ferrari have allowed their fans around the world to choose the name of their 2014 Formula One car. Over 1 million votes were received, and in the end the name that was chosen is F14 T.

It’s already been noticed by quite a few on social media that the new car’s name looks remarkably like FIAT, something Ferrari may or may not have been aware of before the voting started.

The options were: F14 T; F14 Maranello; F14 Scuderia; F166 Turbo; and F616. Of those options, F14 T and F166 Turbo were comfortably the most popular, and in the end the difference between the two was just 1.7% (around 19,000) of the votes. Here’s the full list of results:

Results of voting for the 2014 F1 Ferrari name (Image: Ferrari)

Results of voting for the 2014 F1 Ferrari name (Image: Ferrari)

The F14 T will be unveiled online on Saturday 25 January at 14:30 CET.

2014 F1 Ferrari to be unveiled on 25 January

Ferrari's 2014 F1 car will be unveiled on 24 January (Image: Ferrari)

Ferrari’s 2014 F1 car will be unveiled on 24 January (Image: Ferrari)

Ferrari’s challenger for the 2014 Formula One season will be revealed online on 25 January before making its track debut in Jerez three days later.

Ferrari have asked their fans to choose the name of the new car from the following options: F14 T, F14 Maranello, F14 Scuderia, F166 Turbo or F616. Voting takes place on Ferrari’s website.

The response has thus far been overwhelming, according to Ferrari. Within just a few hours, the voting tally stood at over 105,000. As of today (Thursday 16 January 2014) the two most popular names are F14 T and F166 Turbo, with the other three options struggling to keep up.

Whichever name is chosen, it will be revealed on 24 January, the day before the first images of the car will be revealed.

Fernando Alonso, who is entering his fifth season as a Ferrari driver, seems keen on the new car being called “F14 T”. Alonso tweeted yesterday:

 

Alonso quickest in shortened FP1 in Austin

Fernando Alonso was fastest in a delayed and shortened FP1 in Austin, Texas (Image: Ferrari)

Fernando Alonso was fastest in a delayed and shortened FP1 in Austin, Texas (Image: Ferrari)

Fernando Alonso set the pace in a delayed and shortened Free Practice 1 session at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas. Jenson Button was second fastest for McLaren, ahead of Valtteri Bottas, who was third for Williams.

The circuit was shrouded in heavy mist at the scheduled start time of the session. The conditions were too poor for the medical helicopter to take off, which meant the start of the session had to be delayed.

40 minutes after the scheduled start time, conditions had improved enough for practice to get underway. It was announced at that point that the session would be shortened to an hour as a result of the late start. Heikki Kovalainen was first out on track, keen to get as much mileage under his belt as he acclimatizes to the Lotus team after being drafted in to replace Kimi Raikkonen, who has undergone surgery on his back and is out for the remainder of the season.

All of the drivers did at least one lap before returning to the pits. The McLarens of Jenson Button and Sergio Perez made good use of the early running time, racking up as many laps as possible in the 15 minutes before the red flag came out and the session was stopped.

The cause of the stoppage was soon revealed: the medical helicopter, quite apart from not being able to take off, had not even arrived. The session had only started at all because the helicopter had apparently been on its way to the track, but when the drivers started to set quick lap times and the helicopter had not arrived, race control had no choice but to halt the session on the grounds of safety.

Half an hour later the medical helicopter finally arrived and the session could continue. When the green flag came out, there were just 32 minutes remaining in the session, as it had to be further shortened to finish by 11am local time, as F1 regulations require a break of at least 2 hours between F1 sessions and FP2 is scheduled for 2pm.

At the end of the combined 47 minute practice session, Fernando Alonso was quickest for Ferrari, demonstrating that his aching back is not affecting his ability to drive on the limit. Jenson Button completed 25 laps, more than any other driver, and set the second fastest lap time in the session. Valtteri Bottas was an impressive third for Williams.

Heikki Kovalainen, in his first practice session for Lotus, was just a quarter of a second off the pace of his team-mate, Romain Grosjean. Considering that Kovalainen had never driven the Lotus E21 before today, that is an impressive performance from the Finn.

Daniil Kvyat made his F1 weekend debut, driving Jean-Eric Vergne’s Toro Rosso in FP1 just a week after earning his FIA Super Licence. Kvyat will race for Toro Rosso in 2014. Other drivers who subbed in for the session were Rodolfo Gonzalez, who drove Jules Bianchi’s Marussia, and Alexander Rossi, who took over Giedo van der Garde’s Caterham in front of his home crowd.

Gonzalez coasted to a halt in the closing stages of the session as his Marussia’s engine switched off to protect itself from imminent failure. That was the only on-track incident of the session.

Full result from FP1:

Pos No Driver Team Time Gap Laps
1 3 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 1:38.343 16
2 5 Jenson Button McLaren-Mercedes 1:38.371 0.028 25
3 17 Valtteri Bottas Williams-Renault 1:38.388 0.045 17
4 12 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber-Ferrari 1:38.532 0.189 18
5 9 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 1:38.657 0.314 21
6 10 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 1:38.979 0.636 21
7 4 Felipe Massa Ferrari 1:39.005 0.662 17
8 2 Mark Webber Red Bull Racing-Renault 1:39.083 0.740 17
9 11 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber-Ferrari 1:39.158 0.815 17
10 16 Pastor Maldonado Williams-Renault 1:39.200 0.857 15
11 8 Romain Grosjean Lotus-Renault 1:39.238 0.895 13
12 6 Sergio Perez McLaren-Mercedes 1:39.256 0.913 17
13 7 Heikki Kovalainen Lotus-Renault 1:39.487 1.144 18
14 15 Adrian Sutil Force India-Mercedes 1:39.699 1.356 15
15 14 Paul di Resta Force India-Mercedes 1:39.836 1.493 15
16 19 Daniel Ricciardo STR-Ferrari 1:39.863 1.520 19
17 18 Daniil Kvyat STR-Ferrari 1:40.065 1.722 20
18 1 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull Racing-Renault 1:40.662 2.319 21
19 21 Alexander Rossi Caterham-Renault 1:41.399 3.056 21
20 23 Max Chilton Marussia-Cosworth 1:41.605 3.262 19
21 20 Charles Pic Caterham-Renault 1:42.054 3.711 19
22 22 Rodolfo Gonzalez Marussia-Cosworth 1:43.716 5.373 17

Vettel’s not close to Schumacher’s records

Michael Schumacher congratulates Sebastian Vettel on his third title in 2012 © Daimler

Michael Schumacher congratulates Sebastian Vettel on his third title in 2012 © Daimler

Sebastian Vettel has been so dominant over the last four seasons it’s been suggested that it’s only a matter of time before he overhauls Michael Schumacher’s major records in the sport. But that’s not particularly realistic. Let’s take a look at how things stand right now:

Schumacher Vettel Difference
Championships 7 3 4
Wins 91 33 58
Podiums 155 56 99
Pole Positions 68 41 27
Fastest Laps 77 19 58

Now let’s look at each of these categories separately:

Championships

Vettel is four World Championships behind Michael Schumacher in the record list. That’s the equivalent of the entire career of Alain Prost, who is certainly among the all-time greats. Even assuming Vettel wins the 2013 Drivers’ Championship (which looks pretty much inevitable at this stage of the season), Vettel will still have to win another three titles just to match Schumacher, nevermind exceed his achievements.

Consider the drivers who have finished their F1 careers with three titles: Jack Brabham, Jackie Stewart, Niki Lauda, Nelson Piquet and Ayrton Senna. That’s a formidable list. Vettel has already matched the championship tally of each of these drivers, and won more races than all but Senna, but the task of Vettel doing it all again is a rather tall order indeed.

It’s not fair to Vettel to expect him to overhaul Schumacher’s championship tally. He’s looking set to equal Prost on four. Perhaps he’ll be in a position to win another one and equal Fangio. It’s much too early to start talking about Schumacher’s seven titles.

Wins

Vettel is currently fourth on the list of all-time winners with 33 victories. Schumacher won 91 races, 58 more than Vettel has so far in his F1 career. 58 wins is more than second-placed man Alain Prost won in his career (Prost won 51). So far, Vettel has won 28.95% of the races he has entered. At that rate, he would have to compete for another 200 races to match Schumacher’s victory tally. 200 races is close to double Vettel’s career so far. It’s so far away from being realistic that it’s not worth discussing further for at least another 5 years.

Podiums

Schumacher stood on the podium 155 times. Vettel has so far appeared on the podium 56 times. That’s a difference of 99 podiums, more than Fernando Alonso has achieved in his career, and Alonso is third in that particular all-time list.

Vettel is very far away from matching Schumacher’s podium finishes. Again, let’s come back to this one in a few years.

Pole Positions

At last, here’s a record that Vettel seems likely to challenge in his career. Schumacher’s tally of 68 pole positions is only 27 successful qualifying sessions away for Vettel. If Red Bull continue to produce cars as stunningly fast as those Vettel has raced for the past four seasons, Vettel could (in theory) beat Schumacher’s pole position tally by the end of 2014. He’d have to take pole at every race between now and then, which is not likely. But it does seem inevitable that Vettel will break this particular Schumacher record at some point.

In only his seventh season of Formula One, Vettel has already put himself third in the all-time list of polesitters. He has only Senna (on 65) and Schumacher ahead. It’s a fairly safe bet that the pole position record will have Vettel’s name on it within the next five years, and perhaps a bit sooner than that.

Fastest Laps

Surprisingly, Vettel is not even in the top ten when it comes to setting fastest race laps. He’s recorded just 19, compared to Schumacher’s mammoth total of 77. In fairness to Vettel, his career has taken place almost entirely in the post-refueling era, which makes it much less obvious that the fastest lap should go to the driver of the fastest car. Schumacher was famous for delivering qualifying-style laps just before he pitted for fuel in his Ferrari career, which explains his rather huge fastest lap record (second on the list is Prost on “only” 41). But those days are done, for now at least. If refueling reappears during Vettel’s career, then he might begin to approach this record.

As things stand, Vettel would have to have a very long career indeed to catch up the 58 fastest laps by which he currently trails Schumacher.

Vettel is a great driver. Even at the rather youthful age of 26, he’s worthy of consideration for inclusion in any list of the top 5 drivers of all time. He looks set to feature at the front in Formula One for as long as he is inclined to be a part of the sport.  But it’s far too early in his career to be talking about Schumacher’s records, with the possible exception of the pole position record.

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